Author Topic: King James was Never a Homosexual  (Read 76 times)

TalithaCumi

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King James was Never a Homosexual
« on: May 06, 2019, 09:24:40 PM »

King James was never a sodomite. Satan knows that his time is fast running out. Satanist controls the Internet, and lately they've been spreading so muxh vicious lies and misinformation to get as much Souls as possible out of the Way of eternal Life. In 2009, when I first read "He Came To Set The Captives Free" by Rebecca Brown, I went on YouTube and I saw so many testimonies of from the people and ex-satanists that got delivered through her ministry. I was shocked beyonds words last months when I again searched youtube for such and saw that they've been removed! Worst still, Satanists (pretends to be Christians that exposes fake Prophets) have uploaded so many false scandalous videos about this wonderful woman of God, such that I pity those that may newly read her book and want to search about her. Satanic battle for Christian Souls has been taken right into the Churches by Satanists pretending to be Christians, they destroying everything that strengthens Christians Faith by streading lies and misinformation. From Name of JESUS Christ, to YAHWEH, to real HOLY SPIRIT filled Christian Musics, etc. The End Time is truly here.

"The man that HOLY SPIRIT used to facilitate the publication of the King James Version of the Bible was a man named James (known as James VI while ruling Scotland and James I while ruling neighboring England). James was the ruler of Scotland from July 24, 1567 to 1625, and the ruler of England from March 24, 1603 to 1625."
Actually, since he fathered eight children, he couldn’t have been much of a homosexual! He wrote love letters to his wife and obviously enjoyed her most intimate company. He referred to her as “our dearest bedfellow” (Gustavus Paine, The Men Behind the King James Version, p. 4). When John Rainolds questioned the phrase in the Anglican marriage service, “with my body I thee worship,” King James replied: “... if you had a good wife yourself, you would think that all the honor and worship you could do to her would be well bestowed” (Ibid.).

Unlike Julius Caesar, nobody ever heard any iota of rumour, no matter how small,  of king James being gay when he was alive.
The scandalous homosexuality allegation was made by the king’s enemies only long years after his death. Stephen Coston’s book King James the VI of Scotland and the I of England Unjustly Accused? (St. Petersburg, FL: Konigswort, 1996) makes the case that the charge was slanderous and untrue. The charge was first made by Anthony Weldon, who had been expelled from his office by James for political reasons and had sworn that he would have his day of vengeance. Weldon not only hated James, he hated the entire Scottish race. Historian Maurice Lee, Jr., warned, “Historians can and should ignore the venomous caricature of the king’s person and behavior drawn by Anthony WWeldon”

Actually, since he fathered eight children, he couldn’t have been much of a homosexual! He wrote love letters to his wife and obviously enjoyed her most intimate company. He referred to her as “our dearest bedfellow” (Gustavus Paine, The Men Behind the King James Version, p. 4). When John Rainolds questioned the phrase in the Anglican marriage service, “with my body I thee worship,” King James replied: “... if you had a good wife yourself, you would think that all the honor and worship you could do to her would be well bestowed” (Ibid.).

In a book that the king wrote for his son Henry (entitled Basilikon Doron, or A King’s Gift), he made the following statements about the importance of sexual purity:
“But the principal blessing [is] in your marrying of a godly and virtuous wife … being flesh of your flesh and bone of your bone. … Marriage is the greatest earthly felicity” (p. 43).

“Keep your body clean and unpolluted while you give it to your wife whom to only it belongs for how can you justly crave to be joined with a Virgin if your body be polluted?” (p. 44).
“When you are married, keep inviolably your promise made to God in your marriage” (p. 45).
“Abstain from the filthy vice of adultery; remember only what solemn promise ye made to God at your marriage” (p. 54).
The king wrote plainly against the sin of homosexuality.
“Especially eschew to be effeminate” (Basilikon Doron, p. 46).
“There are some horrible crimes that ye are bound in conscience never to forgive: such as witchcraft, willful murder, incest, and sodomy” (p. 48).
At the Hampton Court Conference, in three meetings over three days, significant religious decisions were made, but the concerns of the Puritans received only minimal attention. Turning his attention to Scotland, James pressed for the establishment of an episcopacy (a church ruled by bishops) in that land and saw it introduced in 1610. Said James, “If you aim at a Scottish presbytery, it agreeth as well with monarchy, as God and the devil…No bishop, no King!”

One positive result of Hampton Court Conference was the decision to prepare a new translation of the Bible which would eventually be published in 1611.

Though James intended to be lenient to Roman Catholics, he failed to make leniency an official government policy. As a result, a group of Catholics plotted to kill the king when he visited Parliament in the unsuccessful “gunpowder plot” of November 5, 1605. England celebrates this historical event in the form of Guy Fawkes Day.

One particular issue that enemies of Christianity and the Good News Gospel have been popularizing is that king was a homosexual. Much has been made about this matter by his religious enemies, such as the Catholic Church, by his political enemies in Scotland who sought to discredit the monarch, and by the homosexual community today who finds homosexual behavior in many great figures of history including Abraham Lincoln, William Shakespeare, and the biblical heroes David and Jonathan. The rumor also serves the purpose today of discrediting the King James Version of the Bible by the critics of Christianity.

The first charge of homosexuality against James I came twenty five years after his death when he was in no position to defend himself. Those who knew the king defended him and the slanderous rumor died down, only to resurface again with renewed force in modern times.

Very succinctly, the evidence for homosexual behavior in James I does not exist. What does exist is behavior that, to our modern ears, sounds suspicious. For example, it is true that men slept in his bedroom. But those were his body guards that he emploted after four assassination attempts from homosexual Catholic Church that he was fighting against and two kidnapHenry attempts from those evil powerful men that didn't like the fact that he was sanitizing everywhere, subverting their evil rulerships and making the people to live by good conscience. Henry VIII slept with four body guards in his room each night. It is true that James I kissed men on the check, as the French and Arabs do today. But again, this was not unusual behavior for that time period.

Evidences exonerating James I against being a homosexual can be summarized.

First, James I never admitted to being a homosexual.

Second, the king never flaunted inappropriate behavior, nor was he ever found in a compromising situation with Esme Stewart, Robert Carr, or George Villiers, his alleged lovers.

Third, there is no record of anyone accusing the king of being a homosexual during his lifetime. Only after he was gone was he assassinated afresh with a thousand lies.

Fourth, contemporaries complemented the king on the chasteness of his life. Compliments of the king’s morality even came from the Puritans who opposed him on many religious matters. The Puritans had openly preached against Mary, Queen of Scots for her adulteries so they would not have hesitated to speak against the king if he engaged in homosexual activity.

Fifth, the political enemies of the king, such as the English barrister Sir Edward Coke, wrote many unkind things against James I, but never accused him of buggery, as the British call sodomy.

Finally, in the books he authored, James I wrote about how to be a good king. Writing to his son Henry the Prince, in Basilikon Doron (Royal Gift), James I counseled him to never forgive four transgressors: the person engaged in witchcraft, the person who has committed a murder, someone who has committed incest, and the homosexual. Homosexuals do not condemn in others
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 09:51:46 PM by TalithaCumi »

TalithaCumi

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Re: King James was Never a Homosexual
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2019, 09:53:55 PM »
QUESTION: I have been told that King James was a homosexual. Is this true?

ANSWER: No.

EXPLANATION: King James I of England, who authorized the translation of the now famous King James Bible, was considered by many to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, monarchs that England has ever seen.

Through his wisdom and determination he united the warring tribes of Scotland into a unified nation, and then joined England and Scotland to form the foundation for what is now known as the British Empire.
In 1605 a Roman Catholic by the name of Guy Fawkes, under the direction of a Jesuit priest by the name of Henry Garnet, was found in the basement of Parliament with thirty-six barrels of gunpowder which he was to use to blow up King James and the entire Parliament. After killing the king, they planned on imprisoning his children, re-establishing England as a state loyal to the Pope and kill all who resisted
At a time when only the churches of England possessed the Bible in English, King James' desire was that the common people should have the Bible in their native tongue. Thus, in 1603, King James called 54 of history's most learned men together to accomplish this great task. At a time when the leaders of the world wished to keep their subjects in spiritual ignorance, King James offered his subjects the greatest gift that he could give them. Their own copy of the Word of God in English.

James, who was fluent in Latin, Greek, and French, and schooled in Italian and Spanish even wrote a tract entitled "Counterblast to Tobacco",which was written to help thwart the use of tobacco in England.

Such a man was sure to have enemies. One such man, Anthony Weldon, had to be excluded from the court. Weldon swore vengeance. It was not until 1650, twenty-five years after the death of James that Weldon saw his chance. He wrote a paper calling James a homosexual. Obviously, James, being dead, was in no condition to defend himself.

The report was largely ignored since there were still enough people alive who knew it wasn't true. In fact, it lay dormant for years, until recently when it was picked up by Christians who hoped that vilifying King James, would tarnish the Bible that bears his name so that Christians would turn away from God's book to a more "modern" translation.

It seems though, that Weldon's false account is being once again largely ignored by the majority of Christianity with the exception of those with an ulterior motive, such as its author had.

It might also be mentioned here that the Roman Catholic Church was so desperate to keep the true Bible out of the hands of the English people that it attempted to kill King James and all of Parliament in 1605.

In 1605 a Roman Catholic by the name of Guy Fawkes, under the direction of a Jesuit priest by the name of Henry Garnet, was found in the basement of Parliament with thirty-six barrels of gunpowder which he was to use to blow up King James and the entire Parliament. After killing the king, they planned on imprisoning his children, re-establishing England as a state loyal to the Pope and kill all who resisted. Needless to say, the perfect English Bible would have been one of the plot's victims. Fawkes and Garnet and eight other conspirators were caught and hanged.

It seems that those who work so hard to discredit the character of King James join an unholy lot.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 12:30:20 AM by TalithaCumi »